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F.M. de Zulueta, S.J. on Disciplinary Infallibility
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Author:  John Lane [ Thu Jul 13, 2006 1:25 pm ]
Post subject:  F.M. de Zulueta, S.J. on Disciplinary Infallibility

The Church was established by Jesus Christ not only to teach and explain unerringly the revealed Law of God, but also to make laws for the spiritual good of her subjects. Thus, Our Lord said to the Apostles in general: ‘Amen I say to you, whatsoever you shall bind on earth shall be bound also in Heaven, and whatsoever you shall loose upon earth shall be loosed also in Heaven.’ (St. Matt. xviii, 18.)

In these words Our Saviour authorizes the rulers of His Church to bind us morally by means of laws, and likewise to release us from obligations imposed by law. The whole end and purpose for which He founded the Church was to forward the spiritual interests of souls in this world, and so to guide them to Heaven hereafter. Such, then, being the duty assigned to the Church by Christ, she must also have received from Him the corresponding right and power to make such laws as she sees to be necessary for securing those interests.

As a complete and independent spiritual kingdom the Church is competent to make such laws. In other words, she is endowed by her Divine Founder with legislative as well as teaching authority. Thus, while she exercises her power to ‘teach all nations‘ when explaining the Ten Commandments of God, and claims our assent to her teaching, she makes use besides of her authority – equally received from Christ – when framing other laws of her own, and lawfully claims our whole-hearted obedience to them.

But our duty towards Church legislation does not end with mere obedience. Since the Church of Christ has the premise of infallibility for her moral guidance as well as for her doctrinal teaching, it forms part of a Catholic’s duty to recognise as good and righteous the laws which the Church makes for the conduct of all her subjects. For if they could be morally bad the Church would be capable of leading her entire flock morally astray, and so her infallibility in morals would cease.

Letters on Christian Doctrine (First Series), The Ten Commandments of God and the Precepts of the Church by F. M. De Zulueta, S.J. Revised in Accordance with the New Codex of Canon Law by H. Davis, S.J. (St. Beuno’s College) Vol. 1, Ninth Edition, London, Burns Oates & Washbourne Ltd., 1922, pp. 323, 324.

Author:  Vince Sheridan [ Thu Jul 13, 2006 2:59 pm ]
Post subject: 

Pax Christi !

Powerful citation indeed ! If only the Jesuits would have kept this teaching.

In Xto,
Vincent

Author:  abragers [ Thu Jul 13, 2006 8:09 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: F.M. de Zulueta, S.J. on Disciplinary Infallibility

John Lane wrote:
(from Zulueta)
But our duty towards Church legislation does not end with mere obedience. Since the Church of Christ has the premise of infallibility for her moral guidance as well as for her doctrinal teaching, it forms part of a Catholic’s duty to recognise as good and righteous the laws which the Church makes for the conduct of all her subjects. For if they could be morally bad the Church would be capable of leading her entire flock morally astray, and so her infallibility in morals would cease.



I'm trying to understand this. As an example, is this where we run into trouble with the JPII Code of Canon Law which allows non-Catholics to receive the Holy Eucharist??

If I've got that wrong, please explain or provide a better example! Thank you.

Author:  John Lane [ Thu Jul 13, 2006 10:17 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: F.M. de Zulueta, S.J. on Disciplinary Infallibility

abragers wrote:
I'm trying to understand this. As an example, is this where we run into trouble with the JPII Code of Canon Law which allows non-Catholics to receive the Holy Eucharist??


Yes, that is a good example, I believe.

Another is the New Mass, which the SSPX avers is intrinsically evil. It cannot therefore have come from the Catholic Church.

Here are some more authorities, sent to me this morning by John Daly.

Indeed in his celebrated Liturgical Institutions (tom. 2, p. 10, ed. 1878) Dom Guéranger writes that if it were permissible to contest liturgical laws, “…it would follow that the Church had erred in a general discipline, which is heretical.” So there is no exaggerating what is at stake. Nor can the objection be evaded by the claim that the New Mass is not obligatory: “Could the Church, which is the pillar and ground of the truth (1 Tim. 3: 15) and manifestly receives without interruption from the Holy Ghost the teaching of all truth, command, grant or permit what would bring harm to souls and contempt or injury to a sacrament instituted by Christ?” is the rhetorical enquiry made by Pope Gregory XVI in Quo graviora (1833). And St. Thomas Aquinas commenting on the idea that there might be anything inappropriate in the Catholic manner of celebrating the Holy Eucharist writes that “this [idea] is opposed to the custom of the Church, which cannot err, being instructed by the Holy Ghost.” (Summa Theologiae IIa q.83 a.5).

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